Apple Cinnamon Baked French Toast and Country Apple Sausage Ring

 

Apple-Cinnamon Baked French Toast

 – brought to you by The Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 12 – 16

    (What I do to lower the fat content if you are so inclined)

1 large loaf French bread

1 tablespoon cinnamon

8 extra large eggs   (equivalent # egg beaters)

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

3-1/2 cups milk and half   and half (skim and fat-free half and half)

6-8 medium-sized cooking   apples (Cortland, Macintosh, etc.)

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon butter   (delete)

1 tablespoon vanilla

 

Slice bread into 1-½ inch slices. Spray 9×13-inch glass pan with non-stick spray. Place bread in glass dish, making sure to place tightly together. In separate bowl, beat together by hand eggs, ½ cup sugar, milk/half and half and vanilla. Pour ½ of this egg/milk mixture over bread.

 

Peel, core and slice apples. Place sliced apples on top of bread to cover. Pour balance of egg/milk mixture evenly over apples. Mix remaining ½ cup sugar with cinnamon and nutmeg and sprinkle evenly on top of apples. Dot with butter. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

 

Next day: Preheat oven to 350°.  Uncover dish and bake in oven for one hour. It will rise high and brown nicely. Remove from oven and allow to rest for 5 to 10 minutes before serving.  Cut into squares and serve with warm apple cider (recipe below) or maple syrup, plus your favorite breakfast meat.

 

 

 

Apple Cider Syrup 

 (I usually quadruple this recipe so that I use all cider – the syrup keeps well for a long time)

1 cup sugar

2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons cornstarch

1 teaspoon lemon juice

2 cups apple cider

 

 

Mix sugar and cornstarch.  Add cider, lemon juice and cinnamon and place in heavy saucepan.  Cook and stir until thickened.  Serve warm over baked French toast.

 

Country Apple Sausage Ring 

– brought to you by The Mandolin Inn

Serves 12-16

2 pounds sage-flavored   bulk sausage

1 ½ cups herbed or Italian   bread crumbs

2 eggs, slightly beaten

¼ cup minced onion

½ cup milk

1 cup finely chopped apple

 

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly. Press lightly into a greased 6-cup ring mold or Bundt pan.  Bake at 350° for 1 hour, drain and serve. (Note – may be prepared and baked for 30 minutes, then refrigerated overnight and baked for an final 30-60 minutes the next day – the longer time is for situations where you are baking something else  – like baked apple French toast – along with the sausage in the morning.)

 

 

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a Dubuque Iowa bed & breakfast.

Shirred Eggs Florentine in Ham Cups – very pretty and quite tasty

So pretty – shirred (baked) eggs florentine

Shirred Eggs Florentine in Ham(or turkey) Cups – brought to you by the Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 6 people    (indicates changes you can make to lower the fat)

¾ lb fresh spinach, finely torn
2 Tbsp sour cream (fat free)
1   Tbsp finely chopped garlic
1 Tbsp finely chopped fresh tarragon
2   Tbsp butter (PAM)
12 slices Black Forest  or Virginia ham without holes
12 large eggs

  • Preheat oven to 400°
  • Prepare Spinach:

            Cook spinach and garlic in butter with salt and pepper in a large, heavy skillet over moderately high heat, stirring, until spinach is tender and liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat and stir in sour cream and tarragon.

  • Assemble and Bake:

            Fit one slice of ham into each of 12 lightly oiled (PAM) muffin cups. Divide and place spinach mixture into bottom of the 12 ham cups and carefully crack 1 egg into each cup. Bake in the middle of the oven whites are cooked but yolks are still a bit runny, about 15 minutes.

  • Remove ham cups from the muffin tin carefully, using 2 spoons or small spatulas.

  • Serve with your favorite potato recipe (we like fried new red potatoes) and fresh fruit
  • Note – The eggs in this recipe are not fully cooked, which may be of some concern if salmonella is a problem in your area.

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a bed & breakfast in Dubuque Iowa.

Zucchini and Tomato Crustless Quiche

Crustless Zucchini and Roma Tomato Quiche – brought to you by the Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 12-16 people    (indicates changes you can make to lower the fat)

 

1 dozen eggs    (equivalent # egg beaters)

2 large roma tomatoes, 1-1’1/2 cup grape tomatoes or any home grown tomatoes, diced

2   cups cottage cheese (low or nonfat)

4 tablespoons melted butter (omit)

2   cups shredded  cheddar cheese (lite or   low fat cheese)

1 tablespoon fresh basil, finely diced (1 teaspoon   dried)

1 teaspoon minced garlic

½ tablespoon fresh oregano, finely diced (1/2   teaspoon dried)

1 medium zucchini, diced

 

Melt butter in skillet, add minced garlic, diced zucchini and diced tomatoes and sauté until soft. Add basil and oregano, mix well and simmer on low for 10-15 minutes.

In a large bowl beat eggs, then combine the rest of the ingredients and mix well. Spray two deep-dish glass pie pans (or one 9×13 inch glass-baking dish) with cooking spray, and then fill with contents of mixing bowl.  Bake in a 350° oven for 40-45 minutes.  Let stand 5 minutes then cut into wedges and serve.

(Note – this may be prepared in advance except for baking, then refrigerated, covered overnight.)

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a bed & breakfast in Dubuque IA.

Potato-Cheese Strata and Bread Pudding with Apple Cider Sauce

POTATO-CHEESE STRATA – brought to you by the Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 8-12 people    (indicates changes you can make to lower the fat)

 

½ cup green onions, chopped – optional

2/3 cup milk (I use skim milk)

½ teaspoon Tabasco sauce (I use 1+ teaspoons) –or   omit and use oregano and and basil for flavor

2 tablespoons butter (I use lower fat or fat-free   margarine)

1 ½ cup sour cream (I use light or fat free sour   cream)

¼ teaspoon salt (I don’t use)

1 ½ lbs. frozen hash browns or O’Brien Potatoes,   thawed

4 cups shredded Monterey Jack-Colby Cheese ( you   can substitute lower fat cheese like cheddar here)

Optional – 15 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled (I usually use   1-2 strips only, and often none, really just to garnish top of strata)

2/3 cup cream of mushroom soup (I use low fat soup)

8 eggs (you can use egg beaters here)

 

Microwave or sauté the chopped green onions in butter until tender.  Bake the potatoes in a 250° oven for one hour.  In a large bowl beat eggs then combine the rest of the ingredients except for the bacon and mix well. Spray a 9×13 inch glass baking dish with cooking spray then fill with contents of mixing bowl.  Bake in a 350° oven for 60-65 minutes. Sprinkle crumbled bacon over the casserole 10 minutes before the casserole is done.  Let stand 5 minutes then cut and serve.

May be prepared in advance and refrigerated, covered.  If placed in the oven directly from the refrigerator, uncover and bake for 70-75 minutes.

Bread Pudding with Apple Cider Sauce  –  Serves 12

    (What I do to lower the fat content if you are so inclined)

 

Leftover bread – cubed (I   use 2 baguettes of French bread, but cinnamon or sourdough also work nicely) 3 cups half & half (I often   use fat free half and half)
8 oz pkg cream cheese,   cubed (I use Philadelphia   Light or Fat Free) 1 stick butter (I haven’t   found a way to lighten this one up, other than not to use butter at all)
12 eggs, beaten (I often   use egg beaters to lower fat & Cholesterol) ½ cup maple syrup (I use   light or ½ calorie syrup)

 

Coat 9 x 13 inch pan with vegetable spray like PAM.  Place one layer of bread cubes in the pan.  Sprinkle the cubed cream cheese over the bread.  Place another layer of bread over the cream cheese.  Mix remaining four ingredients and pour over top.  Optional – I often sprinkle some raisins or other dried fruit or chocolate chips across the top at this point. Cover and refrigerate overnight.  Bake at 350° for 35-45 minutes.  Let stand 10 minutes and serve with “Apple Cider Syrup.”

 

Apple Cider Syrup  (I usually quadruple this recipe so that I use all cider – the syrup keeps well in the refridgerator for a long time)

 

1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cups apple cider  

 

Mix sugar and cornstarch.  Add cider, lemon juice and cinnamon and place in heavy saucepan.  Cook and stir until thickened.  Serve warm over bread pudding.

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a bed & breakfast in Dubuque Iowa.

Sour Dough Baked French Toast and Old Fashioned Rhubarb Sauce

Sour Dough Baked French Toast!

Sour Dough Baked French Toast – brought to you by The Mandolin Inn

Serves 6-8

    (What I do to lower the fat content if you are so inclined)

 

1 loaf sour dough bread   (or French or Italian) cut in 1 inch slices ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
6 large eggs (egg beaters) ¼ cup butter (light butter   or margarine)
1 ½ cups milk (skim) ½ cup firmly packed light   brown sugar
1 cup cream (fat free half   and half) ½ cup sliced  almonds (use sparingly or delete)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon light corn   syrup
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

 

Coat 9 x 13-inch pan with non-stick cooking spray. Arrange breads slices to fill pan. In a medium bowl combine eggs, milk, cream, vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg. Mix well, then pour over bread slices. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

 

Next Day – preheat oven to 350°.  In a small bowl, add melted butter, sugar and corn syrup. Mix well and spread evenly over bread. Sprinkle with almonds. Bake for 60 minutes, or until puffed and golden.

 

Serve with Old Fashioned Rhubarb sauce (recipe below) and sausage links.

 

Old Fashioned Rhubarb Sauce

 

 

1-2 quarts rhubarb, washed   and cut into small pieces 1–2 pints strawberries,   washed and hulled (optional)
8 cups sugar  

 

Place rhubarb in large saucepan. Cover with sugar. Let these ingredients stand for 12 hours. Then, bring quickly to the boiling point. Add strawberries. Simmer until thick – about 15 minutes.

 

(Note – leftover sauce refrigerates well.)

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a Dubuque Iowa bed & breakfast.

The Schrup Mansion and Mandolin Inn History

THE MANDOLIN INN – HISTORY

 

A well-known architect named Fridolin Heer designed the Mandolin Inn. Mr. Heer was the architect of a large number of magnificent buildings in the Dubuque area.  Some examples of his work are: the Dubuque County courthouse, Behr Funeral Home,  Hoffman Funeral Home, and what is today called the Fanny Stout House.

This house was built in 1908 for Nicholas J. Schrup. Mr. Schrup was the son of a farmer who had emigrated from Luxembourg when Mr. Schrup was two years old.  Nicholas Schrup went on to do many things over the course of his life. Among other things he was deputy city auditor; organized a very lucrative and successful Insurance company; was president of some 5 banks and began the American Trust Bank; was knighted by the King of Belgium for work that he did with refugees of World War I; and was an Iowa State Senator.

In 1884 Schrup married Mary Krauz of Chicago.  They had four children; two daughters and two sons.  The whole family lived in this house starting in 1908. In 1924 Nicholas J. Schrup died and his wife and two daughters (Rosalyn and Lillian) continued to live in the house.  After Mrs. Schrup’s death in 1950 the children gave the house to the Archdiocese of Dubuque who used the house as a convent for the B.V.M. nuns (Blessed Virgin Mary Nuns) until 1972.  At that point the Nuns sold the house and it became a halfway home for juvenile delinquent children.  The property was then purchased by a law firm who used the first floor for their law practice and converted the 2nd, 3rd and basement floors into apartments for college students. 

In 1988 the property was restored back to the way it had looked as a private home and has been operating as a Bed & Breakfast Inn ever since. The Inn established its name from the stained glass window on the staircase depicting St. Cecelia, the patron saint of musicians, carrying a mandolin.  This is the only piece of stained glass (painted glass) in a private home in Dubuque.  The artist that created this beautiful work of art placed one of the panels in upside down, much the same as the Amish do with quilts, or the Navaho Indians do with rugs and the Persians do with carpets.  This is called a blessed error, as nothing is supposed to be perfect except God, or Yahweh or Allah. This stained glass becomes opaque at night and only the leaded glass Corinthian columns that surround the stained portion can be seen.

The style of the home is called “Edwardian”.  King Edward was Queen Victoria’s son and the Edwardian period followed directly after the Victorian period.  The Edwardian style is stall fancy, but not as fussy as the Victorian style.  The lines are cleaner; some might even say masculine.  The Edwardian style used considerably more wood and loved to make use of Corinthian columns (for example: hand-carved, polished granite columns outside, massive oak columns in grand entrance hall and 17 in dining room.)

This is one of the few homes built in this area around the turn of the century that has hard wood floors. (Most other homes have floors of the softwoods, like pine, as all of the hardwoods were supposed to be saved for use in the lead mines for mine shafts.)  Each of the public rooms also has a different pattern of beautiful inlaid parquet.

DINING ROOM – the entire room is surrounded by an oil painting that was painted in Belgium for the house in 1908. Once completed, the canvas was shipped to Dubuque, and then applied to the wall with lacquer, just as though it were wallpaper.  The sideboard is made of white oak and has never been re-finished. It has curved, leaded and beveled glass and a curved mirror that runs from the top of the sideboard down to its midpoint.  The fireplace is made from tiger oak and green Italian tile.

GRAND ENTRANCE HALL – the sole purpose of this hall was to make a statement about Mr. Schrup – to let everyone know from the moment that they entered into the home just how rich, powerful and successful he was.

MUSIC ROOM and PARLOR – The painting on the wall of the Music Room is original.  It was designed to frame a concert grand piano.  When the home was built each wall panel in these two rooms had the same apple blossom and bird theme.  This panel is the only one that they could restore.  When the other panels could not be restored the ones in the Music Room were covered with white silk tapestry and the ones in the Parlor were covered with marbleized oil paintings.  The ceilings of these two rooms have oil paintings on them, but unfortunately someone glued acoustical tile to them (probably to muffle the sounds from the bedrooms or apartments above) and it is very likely that the paintings were destroyed.

B & B History:

In 1988 Judi Sinclair (Fonz) began the restoration of the property. She returned the home to the way it had looked as a private home and opened it up as a Bed & Breakfast Inn. In 1991, Jan Oswald purchased the inn from Judi.  Jan returned the public rooms of the inn to the décor, accoutrements, and furnishings of the Edwardian period.  Each bedroom was christened with a name and decorated in a distinctive fashion that was appropriate to the time that the Schrup family lived in the home.

Amy Boynton purchased the inn in 1998. She had a high-velocity central air-conditioning system installed that maintained the integrity of this historic home. Amy’s primary focus has been on returning the exterior of the building to its former beauty and making the property handicapped accessible in a way that maintains its architectural integrity.

Amy restored the custom-made Spanish green clay tile roof and copper gutters and eave spouts in 1998 and 1999 (and again in 2012 after the hail storm of 2011.) In 2000 she had had the porch soffits restored and then went on to have the entire brick exterior restored. She had new double front staircases installed in that year and then added a handicapped accessible ramp/bridge to the home in the late summer/fall of 2000. Amy had the hand carved limestone front entrance and balustrades replaced with new hand carved limestone in 2000 – 2001. In 2001 Amy added a fishpond to soften the look of the handicapped bridge and make it appear less utilitarian. The house received the Main Street award for Design / Best Historic Rehab of 2000-2001.

Most recently Amy had a remodel completed that allowed for a handicapped accessible guestroom on the first floor and she made the carriage house into a handicapped accessible apartment/owner’s quarters which can now be accessed from both the house and from it’s own private entrance. The House received the Ken Kringle Historic Preservation Award from the City of Dubuque and The Historic Preservation Commission for the best adaptive use and rehabilitation for 2005. The steam boiler that heats the house was replaced in 2007 and half of the Central Air system was upgraded in 2011.

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a Dubuque Iowa bed & breakfast inn.

Recipe for Apricot and Butterscotch Scones – Easy and Delicious

Apricot-Butterscotch Scones – brought to you by The Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 12 generous scones

   

2 cups flour 6  tablespoons butter
2 ½ teaspoons baking   powder ½ cup chopped dried   apricots (or any combination of dried cherries, currants, raisins, etc.)
½ teaspoon salt ½ cup butterscotch chips   (or any other flavor that appeals)
¼ cup sugar 1 egg slightly beaten,   combined with enough buttermilk to equal 1 cup

 

Combine flour, baking powder, salt and sugar. Cut in butter with a pastry blender (or the old fashioned way with two table knives) until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in apricots and butterscotch chips. Slowly stir in egg/buttermilk mixture until mixture just barely holds together. Add more buttermilk if necessary. Drop by generous spoonful on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake at 400° for 15-20 minutes.

Interested in more of Amy’s recipes?

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a bed & breakfast in Dubuque Iowa.

Recipe for Curried Sausage – A Signature Dish here at the Inn

Sausage and Mushrooms with Curry Sauce – brought to you by The Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 12-25

 

 

3-5 pounds mild pork bulk   sausage 4 teaspoons curry powder
3 cups sliced mushrooms 2 cups half & half
4 tablespoons butter 1 cup julienned red, green   and yellow peppers
4 tablespoons flour ½ cup grated parmesan or   romano cheese

 

In skillet, brown sausage, breaking up with spatula.  Drain sausage in a colander.

Sauté mushrooms in skillet.  Place sausage and mushrooms into 2-4 (depending on how much sausage you used – I usually make in large 5 pound batches) glass pie dishes. Melt butter in small saucepan. Stir in flour and curry powder; heat until bubbly. Gradually stir in half- &-half and cook over low heat, stirring constantly until smooth and slightly thick. (If too thick, add more half- &-half.) Pour sauce over sausage mixture. Arrange peppers on top. Sprinkle Parmesan over top. Bake at 350° for 30-45 minutes, or until bubbly.  Serves lots.  

 

(Note – this may be prepared ahead except for baking, then frozen until needed.  Defrost, then bake.)

Interested in more of Amy’s recipes?

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a Dubuque Iowa bed & breakfast.

Recipe for Spinach Quiche – Enjoy!

Crustless Spinach Quiche – brought to you by The Mandolin Inn

 

Serves 12 – 16

    (What I do to lower the fat content if you are so inclined)

 

16 eggs (equivalent # egg   beaters) 1 tablespoon chopped   parsley
8 ounces crumbled feta   cheese – black peppercorn or tomato-basil flavored 1 cup grated Swiss cheese
4 tablespoons melted   butter (omit) 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
12 ounces small curd   cottage cheese (low or nonfat) 10 ounces frozen chopped   spinach, thawed, drained and squeezed dry

 

In a large bowl, mix all ingredients together. Butter two glass deep-dish pie pans or spray with non-stick cooking spray. Pour mixture into prepared pans. Bake at 350° for 30-45 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Allow to set for a few minutes before serving. Cut into wedges.

 

(Note: can be prepared the evening before, then baked in the morning)

 

Interested in more of Amy’s recipes?

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a bed & breakfast in Dubuque Iowa.

Hardwood Floors here in the Inn

Dining Room – Parquet Floor

Dubuque, IA was the lead mining captital of the world until the mid 1860’s. As a result of this it was the law/common paractice around these parts up  until the late 1800’s that people use soft woods for their floors and save the hardwood for the lead mine shafts. The Mandolin Inn (Nicholas Schrup home) was built in 1908 and is one of the few historic homes in either Dubuque or Galena that has hardwood floors. Schrup was knighted by the King of Belgium in 1920 and wanted everyone that entered the home to know that he was Sir Schrup – note the German Cross Medallians on the Grand Hall floor.

Grand Hall – Parquet Floor

During the varied uses of the home over the course of time the beautiful wooden floors often had rugs glued on them in order to protect the wood – particularly during the period when it was a half-way house for juvenile delinquents and later when it was a college apartment/frat house. The nuns glued tile over the hardwood floor of the Ballroom so that the novice nuns could live there. The ballroom floor remains tile covered as it is currently used as a storage attic.

 

About Amy: Amy owns and runs The Mandolin Inn, a bed & breakfast in Dubuque Iowa.